UMTS Training Fundamentals

UMTS Training Fundamentals

Introduction:

UMTS Training Fundamentals by ENO

This UMTS Training Fundamentals course provides an advanced technical overview of current and coming UMTS technologies.. The UMTS Training Fundamentals course examines the principles of CDMA as used in a cellular environment, cell planning considerations, network architecture, channel coding, the Air Interface protocol stack and UMTS Security features.

A 3G mobile communications system which provides an enhanced range of multimedia services. UMTS will speed convergence between telecommunications, IT (Information technology), media and content industries to deliver new services and create fresh revenue generating opportunities. UMTS will deliver low cost, high capacity mobile communications offering data rates as high as 2Mbps under stationary conditions with global roaming and other advanced capabilities. The specifications defining UMTS are formulated by 3GPP

Customize It:

With onsite Training, courses can be scheduled on a date that is convenient for you, and because they can be scheduled at your location, you don’t incur travel costs and students won’t be away from home. Onsite classes can also be tailored to meet your needs. You might shorten a 5-day class into a 3-day class, or combine portions of several related courses into a single course, or have the instructor vary the emphasis of topics depending on your staff’s and site’s requirements.

UMTS Training FundamentalsRelated Courses:

Duration: 2 days

Objectives:

◾Understand the basics of UMTS radio communication
◾Examine UMTS Radio Access Network (UTRAN)
◾Understand the UMTS Core Network
◾Examine the services in the UMTS core network environment
◾3GPP release 99, 4, 5 and 6
◾Understand UMTS Protocols
◾Understand Services in the UMTS Environment
◾Understand Security in the UMTS Environment

Course Content:

UMTS Development
◾Review of 1st and 2nd Generation systems
◾Advanced 2G, and 2.5G technologies:
◾HSCSD
◾GPRS
◾EDGE
◾3rd Generation drivers
◾UMTS Terminology
◾UMTS Frequency Spectrum and Licensing
◾3G Organisations
◾Other systems

UMTS Service Provision
◾Service Provision Philosophy
◾Quality of Service Principle
◾Location Based Services
◾Virtual Home Environment
◾Multimedia Messaging

UMTS Network Architecture
◾Basic UMTS Architecture (Rel. ?99)
◾Core & Access division
◾Core Network Entities:
◾Packet Switched
◾Circuit Switched
◾Databases
◾Additional Elements
◾Evolution to IP
◾Core Network Signalling
◾Core Network Service Provision
◾3rd Party Access
◾Multimedia Provision
◾Internetworking
◾Radio Access Network Entities:
◾Node B
◾Radio Network Controller
◾RAN evolution
◾UTRAN Interfaces:
◾Iu, Iub, Iur, (Uu)
◾Release 99+ Architecture Options

UTRAN Protocol Architecture
◾General Structure
◾Iu interface Protocol Stack (CN-UTRAN)
◾Iub interface Protocol Stack (RNC-Node B)
◾Iur interface Protocol Stack (RNC-RNC)
◾ATM in the UTRAN
◾SS7 in the UTRAN

CDMA Principles for Cellular Systems
◾General Cellular Principles
◾Multiplexing, Multiple Access and Duplex working
◾CDMA Outline
◾Code Functions:
◾Synchronisation
◾Identification
◾Channelisation
◾Spreading
◾Scrambling
◾UMTS CDMA Principles and Codes
◾Implementation and Operational considerations
◾Modulation
◾Multipath Diversity
◾Power Control
◾Handovers
◾Macro / Micro Diversity
◾Cell Breathing
◾Air Interface
◾Air Interface Architecture
◾Structure and Functions of: – Radio Resource Control
◾Radio Link Control
◾Medium Access Control
◾Channel Types and Bearers
◾UMTS Frame Structure
◾FDD Framing
◾Physical Channel Examples:
◾Uplink DPCH
◾Downlink DPCH
◾PRACH
◾Example Procedures:
◾Cell Synchronisation
◾Random Access
◾RRC Connection Establishment

Example Signalling Sequences
◾Location Registration / Update
◾Security Procedures
◾Mutual Authentication
◾Cipher Key Generation
◾Encryption
◾User Confidentiality
◾MO CS call
◾MT CS call
◾MO PS call
◾MT PS call

User Equipment
◾General Architecture
◾Service Capabilities
◾Radio Access Capabilities
◾Power Classes

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Time Frame: 0-3 Months4-12 Months

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